The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires

1974

Action / Horror

6
IMDb Rating 6.0

Synopsis


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1080p 720p
1.70G
Normal
English
/
85 min
P/S 77 / 127
1.08G
Normal
English
/
85 min
P/S 41 / 80

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by The_Void 7

This lovely Hammer Horror blending of the traditional vampire tale with martial arts stars Peter Cushing as Professor Van Helsing. The plot follows Van Helsing, who is drawn into a plot involving a legendary seven golden vampires, the prince of darkness; Dracula himself, the undead and a load of martial artists. Our hero must, along with his son and an escort of kung fu fighters travel to a cursed village somewhere in China to rid it of the vampire curse that holds it. One of the reasons why Hammer horror is so brilliant is that it isn&#39;t afraid to make a film that most other film studios would regard as stupid and then make it work. The main reason why Hammer horror does work is that the films, despite showing many macabre images, are always good natured and made with a lot of heart so they&#39;re easy to like; and this one is no different. <br/><br/>The Eastern style makes for a very different vampire film to what we&#39;re used to, and Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires seems keen to capitalise on that as it changes many of the traditional vampire rules to suit the east (for example, the traditional cross to ward off vampires is replaced by the image of Budha). As usual with Hammer, the effects are hokey to say the least, the production values are low and everyone except Peter Cushing leaves a lot to be desired acting-wise...but without these traits, this film wouldn&#39;t be Hammer, so these things are not only forgivable, but welcome. Peter Cushing&#39;s performance in this movie isn&#39;t his best, but fans of his will still relish it. There&#39;s something about Cushing&#39;s persona that makes him very watchable, and every film with him in it is worth watching, if only for that reason. He also gets involved in some of the martial arts fights, which is nice to see. The fights themselves are very well staged, much better than I was expecting with this being a horror film with kung fu elements, rather than a full blown fight-fest.<br/><br/>This is the fifth film I&#39;ve seen by Hammer director Roy Ward Baker and although it&#39;s not the best, it&#39;s still a very solid offering from the man who was probably Hammer&#39;s finest director. This film is a lot of fun, and I don&#39;t doubt that it will delight anyone who sees it, and therefore it comes with the highest recommendations from me.

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Reviewed by Platypuschow 6

Peter Cushing returns as Van Helsing once again but this time he&#39;s jumped across the pond and is a lecturer in China. <br/><br/>When an opportunity arises to investigate some local vampire mythology he teams with a group of martial artists to foil the scheme of the Prince of Darkness himself Dracula.<br/><br/>What makes this stand out from all the other Hammer Horror films is the attempt at genre blending. Hammer Horror blended with martial arts and with a proper martial arts movie studio to assist them.<br/><br/>Somehow it actually manages to work, the plot is credible and the action is fast and furious. <br/><br/>Peter Cushing is oddly stoic here and not on form at all and the absence of Christopher Lee is highly damaging. John Forbes-Robertson was just not up to the job at all.<br/><br/>Regardless this is a fun little Hammer Horror film that tries to break away from the usual mould. Less cheesy, tad more violent but the awful looking bats are still present.<br/><br/>The Good:<br/><br/>Decent choreography<br/><br/>Some nice ideas<br/><br/>The Bad:<br/><br/>John Forbes-Robertson <br/><br/>Some even worse than usual sfx<br/><br/>Things I Learnt From This Movie:<br/><br/>Women cannot go to unknown territories<br/><br/>Christopher Lee simply IS Dracula, replacing him is like re-casting Freddy Kreuger and nobody would ever do that! Right?

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Reviewed by BA_Harrison 8

By the beginning of the 1970s, Hammer Studios, once a world leader in horror, found itself struggling to compete with the harder hitting, more explicit fare coming out of the US. In a last ditch effort to appeal to a wider audience, the ailing studio began to experiment with horror &#39;cross-overs&#39;, injecting their traditional Gothic fare with elements from whatever other genres were enjoying global success at the time.<br/><br/>In 1974, the studio released two such genre-bending &#39;mash-ups&#39;: The Satanic Rites of Dracula, an espionage/vampire film in which Dracula was reinvented as a Blofeld-style villain intent on destroying the world, and The Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires, which saw Hammer join forces with Hong Kong&#39;s Shaw Brothers for some martial-arts monster fun.<br/><br/>For a Hammer film, Satanic Rites was an uncharacteristically drab affair, lacking visual flair and any sense of excitement; in fact, rather than turn the studio&#39;s fortune around, it probably helped to drive a few more nails firmly into its coffin. Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires, on the other hand, was a much more enjoyable effort: helmed by Roy Ward Baker, it delivered stylish colourful photography, great fight choreography by kung fu legend Liu Chia-Liang, sexy ladies from around the world (Norwegian babe Julie Ege and Taiwanese cutie Szu Shih), as well as blood, boobs, bats and bonkers action set-pieces. Despite the high fun-factor, however, AND another quality performance from Peter Cushing, it too failed to lure back the fans.<br/><br/>Count Dracula, it seemed, had finally met his match, not in Van Helsing, but in chainsaw wielding maniacs and possessed girls vomiting pea soup—a pity, because I would have loved to have seen more joint ventures from Hammer and Shaw Brothers, two of the greatest studios in the history of cinema.

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