The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

1939

Crime / Mystery

0
IMDb Rating 7.5

Synopsis


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1.56G
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English
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85 min
P/S 63 / 157
1013.76M
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English
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85 min
P/S 37 / 104

Movie Reviews

Reviewed by telegonus 10

Released in the landmark movie year of 1939, this is my favorite Sherlock Holmes film. It is set in the proper period, has a reasonable budget, excellent sets, and fog so thick one would have to cut it with a razor. The story has to do with Professor Moriarity's scheme to steal the crown jewels. More than anything, however, the movie is a vehicle for Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, whose interpretations of Holmes and Watson are so engaging and larger than life that several decades later actors are still compared (usually unfavorably) to these two whenever they attempt to take on these roles. Rathbone makes an impressive Holmes,--cunning, gentlemanly, high-minded, somewhat competitive, intensely focused. One of the many things that makes Rathbone so perfect as Holmes is that while he may fall short of the mark in his portrayal of the character Conan Doyle created in print, he is an ideal movie Holmes. There's an heroic quality to him. Rathbone was more than a bit of a swashbuckler on screen, as is obvious in his many duels with Flynn and Power, and he brought some of this edgy, assertive quality to his interpretation of Holmes, and as is so often the case when an actor varies somewhat from a character created in fiction (Bogart is a far cry from Hammett's "blonde Satan" of a Sam Spade), this can actually work in his favor. Rathbone is Hollywood's Sherlock Holmes, and I can't imagine a better one. Bruce often played Watson as a bumbler later in the series, but in the early entries was more serious and competent. His movie Watson is overall somewhat comical, and creates a charming contrast to the grim, determined Holmes, and works for me because I like a little respite from the seriousness of a mystery, any mystery, since the genre is melodramatic, and hard to take when it gets too heavy. With Bruce on hand it never does.

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Reviewed by Ron Oliver 7

THE ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES takes him into deadly conflict with Britain&#39;s most dangerous criminal mastermind, Professor Moriarty.<br/><br/>20th Century Fox takes us back to the foggy London streets of 1894 in these exciting exploits of the world&#39;s most famous private consulting detective. The production values are of a high order in this story based on William Gillette&#39;s stage play about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle&#39;s celebrated characters. Basil Rathbone &amp; Nigel Bruce return as Holmes and Watson, perfectly portraying that legendary literary partnership with good grace and cheerfulness, Rathbone allowing some traces of humanity to infuse Holmes&#39; cerebral haughtiness, and Bruce, bumbling and big-hearted, enacting the embodiment of a staunch companion and friend.<br/><br/>Unfairly relegated to 6th place billing is George Zucco, marvelous as Moriarty. He presents us with a consummate villain of enormous intellect &amp; subtle nuance, a monster passionate about his exotic plants but indifferent to human life. It is highly enjoyable watching him plot a dastardly crime while engaging in a masterful duel of wits with Holmes.<br/><br/>The other roles are also very well cast and highlight some fine British character actors: lovely Ida Lupino as a young woman frantic over an unknown evil stalking her family; handsome Alan Marshal as her family&#39;s lawyer; dignified Henry Stephenson as the worried Constable of the Tower of London; E.E. Clive as the dogged Scotland Yard inspector; and Mary Forbes as a kindly noblewoman who befriends Miss Lupino.<br/><br/>Some rather brief performances also enhance the whole: Mary Gordon as Holmes&#39; grandmotherly landlady and young Terry Kilburn as his page boy; Peter Willes as Miss Lupino&#39;s terrified brother; elderly Frank Dawson as Moriarty&#39;s harassed butler; Holmes Herbert as a highly frustrated Law Court Justice; and William Austin as a stranger who has a peculiar encounter with Watson on a London sidewalk.<br/><br/>Two lighthearted moments especially standout -- Rathbone delightfully in disguise, and, at the very conclusion of the film, Watson deftly turning the tables on Holmes.<br/><br/>This was the second in a series of Holmes films starring Rathbone &amp; Bruce which began at Fox Studios. It followed THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES (1939) and, after the jump to Universal Studios, preceded SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE VOICE OF TERROR (1942) three years later.

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Reviewed by nnnn45089191 8

The follow-up to the the very successful The Hound of the Baskervilles,is even better than its predecessor.Basil Rathbone gives a marvelous performance as the super-sleuth.His performance in disguise as a singer at a party is fantastic.He was totally unrecognizable.Nigel Bruce was as always good as Holmes &#39;s sidekick Dr.Watson.But what elevates this entry in the Holmes-series was the portrayal of George Zucco&#39;s Dr.Moriarty,Holmes&#39;s nemesis. Moriarty&#39;s plot to break his enemy was rather clever.I enjoyed seeing Rathbone really getting in to the persona of Holmes in this one.The movie&#39;s short running-time was perhaps my only disappointment.

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